E Komo Mai

The Friends of Hanauma Bay is dedicated to the conservation of coastal and marine environments, emphasizing stewardship of the natural resources of Hanauma Bay. If you love Hanauma Bay, join us in our efforts to preserve the Bay for future generations.

28 January 2013 ~ Comments Off

The Perceptions of Coastal Resource Managers in Hawai‘i: The Current Situation and Outlook for the Future

Shawn Carrier, Outreach Specialist, UH Sea Grant’s Hanauma Bay Education Program

This presentation highlights my graduate thesis research that looked to identify significant threats to Hawai‘i’s coastal resources, challenges and barriers to management, and ways to enable effective solutions. The research was undertaken with the vision of being able to support the daily decisions of resource managers, policy makers, and funding agencies that work collaboratively to protect our coastal resources. It was suggested that this work could serve as a model in regards to how science can support management as it is easily reproduced at a low cost. To learn more join us on Thursday evening.

As always, these events begin at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday evening in the theatre at the Hanauma Bay Education Center.  Events are free and open to the public, with no charge for parking after 5:30 p.m.  We hope to see you on Thursday evening!  These programs are supported and funded by the City and County of Honolulu Department of Parks and Recreation.

For more information on UH Sea Grant Hanauma Bay Education Program events and activities, navigate to the “Calendar of Events” located at www.hanaumabayeducation.org.

18 January 2013 ~ Comments Off

Global Diversity and Marine Protected Areas by Dr. Camilo Mora

On Thursday evening January 24th, the UH Sea Grant Hanauma Bay Education Program resumes its public outreach series at the City and County of Honolulu’s Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve.

Thursday January 24,

Global Diversity and Marine Protected Areas

Dr. Camilo Mora, Assistant Professor, Geography Department, UHM

Ever wonder if marine protected areas are successful in preserving biodiversity? Are they really effective? This presentation highlights the unique nature of biodiversity, its considerable decline and the lack of efficient strategies to reverse such a trend in the near horizon. The sharp contrasts between the decline of ecosystem services and increasing human demand suggest that such services will soon fall short and exacerbate critical problems of human welfare. Dr. Mora evaluated hundreds of marine protected areas globally to try to answer these difficult questions and the results may surprise you! To learn more join us on Thursday evening.

As always, these events begin at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday evening in the theatre at the Hanauma Bay Education Center.  Events are free and open to the public, with no charge for parking after 5:30 p.m.  We hope to see you on Thursday evening!  These programs are supported and funded by the City and County of Honolulu Department of Parks and Recreation.

For more information on UH Sea Grant Hanauma Bay Education Program events and activities, navigate to the “Calendar of Events” located at www.hanaumabayeducation.org.

08 January 2013 ~ Comments Off

Hanauma Bay Thursday Evening Jan 10

Happy New Year! On Thursday evening January 10th, the UH Sea Grant Hanauma Bay Education Program resumes its public outreach series at the City and County of Honolulu’s Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve.

Thursday January 10,

Climate change and how it will impact Hawai‘i in the future

Dr. Steven Businger, Professor, Department of Meteorology, University of Hawai‘i Mānoa

For the past ten years, Dr. Businger has been active in researching the evolution and structure of destructive atmospheric storms, including: frontal cyclones, hurricanes, and severe thunderstorms. An initial focus of his work was on cold-air cyclogenesis and arctic hurricanes. More recently research has focused on the structure of the inflow layer of tropical hurricanes and the development of a hurricane balloon instrument platform. He has also been active in research on the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) to monitor the atmosphere.

As always, these events begin at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday evening in the theatre at the Hanauma Bay Education Center.  Events are free and open to the public, with no charge for parking after 5:30 p.m.  We hope to see you on Thursday evening!  These programs are supported and funded by the City and County of Honolulu Department of Parks and Recreation.

For more information on UH Sea Grant Hanauma Bay Education Program events and activities, navigate to the “Calendar of Events” located at www.hanaumabayeducation.org.

10 December 2012 ~ Comments Off

Hanauma Bay Thursday Evening December 13 – Voyage of the Lonely Turtle, a film produced for PBS by Nature

Aloha Thursday Evening Patrons,

On Thursday evening December 13th, the UH Sea Grant Hanauma Bay Education Program resumes its public outreach series at the City and County of Honolulu’s Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve. Although the nature preserve will be closed to the public during the day for repaving of the parking lot, I have been assured it will be ready to conduct our Thursday evening program.  

Thursday December 13,

Voyage of the Lonely Turtle

A film produced for PBS by Nature

A solitary loggerhead turtle in the middle of a vast ocean may not sound like an adventure film, but stick with her. Along her 9,000-mile voyage to nest, our loggerhead tour guide in Voyage of the Lonely Turtle encounters hammerhead sharks, deep ocean tempests, and man-made death traps in the form of fishing nets and hooks. Her body of well-suited armor and specialized adaptations for deep-ocean dwelling will help the sea turtle evade many of the ocean’s menaces. But this is just one set of challenges to overcome. Here is another: she must find her way across the Pacific, from Mexico to a small stretch of beach in Japan, a precise location that she has been to just once before, as a two-inch hatchling, decades ago.

Researchers have learned a great deal about how this curious creature could make such a phenomenal voyage. Some of the most valuable information was gained from a single voyage. Scientist Wallace J. Nichols released the captive loggerhead turtle, Adelita, into the Pacific a decade ago. Over the course of a year, Adelita did what no sea turtle had ever done before, she took researchers and turtle enthusiasts along on her journey, to her beach, to nest. Since then, researchers have shed much light on how sea turtles like loggerheads navigate the astounding trip. One of the more fascinating aspects of this navigation is the turtle’s use of magnetic mapping to chart its course. 

As always, these events begin at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday evening in the theatre at the Hanauma Bay Education Center.  Events are free and open to the public, with no charge for parking after 5:30 p.m.  We hope to see you on Thursday evening!  These programs are supported and funded by the City and County of Honolulu Department of Parks and Recreation.

For more information on UH Sea Grant Hanauma Bay Education Program events and activities, navigate to the “Calendar of Events” located at www.hanaumabayeducation.org

 

04 December 2012 ~ Comments Off

HOW GOOD WERE THE “GOOD OLD DAYS”?

By Alan Hong, Hanauma Bay Manager Emeritus (re-posted from a 2007 FOHB Newsletter)

Liz Kumabe from our Education Program recently showed me the report from an activities study done in Hanauma Bay in 1964. The data reminded me of how our way of thinking has changed when faced with a massively growing population and rapidly diminishing natural resources.

Older kama’aina have fond memories of parking on the beach, picnicking, camping, fishing, and spearing in Hanauma Bay. For many of them, the conservation restrictions, the crowd control measures, the smoking ban, the admission fee, the construction of an Education Center and required viewing of an orientation video are changes that make them long for the good old days.

Here’s some data from those “Good old days”. The survey was done on two weekends in June of 1964, and gives a daily average of weekend activities found in Hanauma Bay. This type of data helps refresh our memory as to how we once treated this place.

  • Mean number of persons with skin diving gear 121
  • Mean number of persons with SCUBA gear 7
  • Mean number of persons with spear guns 45
  • Mean number of persons with fishing poles 51
  • Mean number of persons with dip and throw nets 15
  • Mean number of persons with hammers or crowbars 7
  • Mean number of persons bow fishing or squidding 3

Yes, it was not unusual back then for ocean users to carry hammers or crowbars. From observations, the study went on to estimate the number of coral heads removed on weekends as 468 per year. The weekend removal of fish was estimated as 1,092 per year.
In this day and age, it is difficult to imagine a Hanauma Bay without the conservation designation that gives us the abundant marine life, the crowd control measures that limit congestion, the smoking ban that gives us clean air and sand, the admission fee that makes us self sufficient, and the Education Center and video that enhances our preservation.

This year marks forty years since Hanauma Bay became Hawaii’s first Marine Life Conservation District and the fifth year since the grand opening of the our Education Center. These landmarks will be highlighted by several educational activities this summer.

As we celebrate all the good changes that have occurred at Hanauma Bay, let’s take some time to acknowledge that these changes would not have happened were it not for the vision of dedicated people who were willing to campaign a needed cause in the face of a society opposed to change.

30 September 2012 ~ Comments Off

Ron Walker

Ron Walker

Hanauma Bay volunteer Ron Walker passed away on September 30, 2012. Ron worked diligently on the native plant garden with winter snowbird volunteers Chuck & Carol Harms. He was at the Bay every Tuesday maintaining the hillside plants throughout the year.

Ronald retired in 2003 having served as a wildlife biologist, manager and administrator with the State Department of Land & Natural Resources for 37 years and as a fish and wildlife biologist with the Refuges & Ecological Services offices of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Services for 8 years.

His interest in Hawai‘i’s wildlife began as a Hilo High student, counting pheasants for the State on horseback during the summer and hunting sheep on Mauna Kea on weekends.

He was a graduate of Oregon State University and the U.S. Naval Communications School in Washington D.C.

In the 1970s he led the Hawaiian Waterbirds Recovery Team, which produced the first waterbird recovery plan. In his early years he led the moulton/feral sheep hybridization project on Mauna Kea and State-wide game bird introduction program.

He served on the board of directors of the Hawai‘i Audubon Society, Ahahui Malama I ka Lokahi and Hawai‘i Botanical Society. He was an active volunteer with many organizations including the Nature Conservancy of Hawai‘i, Kaelepulu Wetland Sanctuary, Na Ala Hele & Hawai‘i Nature Center.

Ron Walker2

He was also an accomplished graphic illustrator and created the artwork for the license plate benefiting the State Department of Land & Natural Resources.

08 May 2012 ~ Comments Off

Robert “Bob” Blair Graham

Robert GrahamBorn May 9, 1929 in Hot Lake, Oregon, HBEP volunteer Bob Graham passed away May 8, 2012, at 82.

Bob was raised in Boise, Idaho. He was a resident of Honolulu for 45 years and retired as Director of Data Systems for the City & County of Honolulu.  He served as the Cub Scout Pack 115 Cubmaster, the Aina Haina PTA President and Niu Valley Community Association President.  Bob was active during his retirement years serving as a volunteer for AARP and the Bishop Museum. He was a member of the Elks Club and the Saint Andrews Society of Hawaii.

Bob was an avid and active walker, surfer, traveler, RV owner, fisherman, snorkeler and bagpipe lover. To satisfy these passions he traveled to all 50 states, every province in Canada (except one) and circumnavigated Australia and New Zealand.

He is survived by wife Elizabeth Lloyd Noroian; sons John W. (Kathy), Thomas L. (Claudia), Roderick W. (Tetuanui); 11 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild!